How to use the OFFSET function in Google Sheets

The OFFSET function in Google Sheets references a range of cells that are shifted or displaced from a starting reference cell. You specify this displacement by a number of rows and columns. In other words, OFFSET references a range that is a specific number of rows and columns away from the starting cell.

If you want to offset multiple cells, you also indicate the size of the range of cells using height and width parameters.

Offset is a handy function that allows you to use dynamic ranges in formulas. This means that the function will adapt to changes in the spreadsheet, such as when you add new data or columns.

Here’s how OFFSET works:

Syntax

=OFFSET(cell_reference, offset_rows, offset_columns, [height], [width])

  • cell_reference – the starting reference cell (or base cell) from which the range of cells is displaced.
  • offset_rows – the number of rows the range of cells displaces by. This takes in integer values, including negative numbers.
  • offset_columns – the number of columns the range of cells displaces by. Similar to offset_columns, this also takes in integer values, including negative numbers.
  • height – an optional parameter that specifies the height of the returning range of cells, starting from the offset cell that the above three parameters determine. This can be ignored if the reference to return is a single cell.
  • width – like height, this is an optional parameter that specifies the width of the returning range of cells starting from the offset cell, that the first three parameters determine. Similarly, you can also ignore this if the reference to return is a single cell.

I’ll illustrate this concept in the following image:

OFFSET function 1

Here, I have typed some data into the red range of cells.

I am using the OFFSET function to reference that data in the gold range of cells, by typing the formula =OFFSET(B2,6,4,3,5).

How to use the OFFSET function

As is the case with all functions and formulas, the best way to understand OFFSET is to see it in use.

Below is some fictional sales data for a few employees across several business quarters.

As you can see, I have used a different OFFSET function in each row:

OFFSET function 2

If you use the OFFSET function directly, like I did in rows 2 and 3, it directly returns the range of cells and displays them across the spreadsheet. Therefore, for the case in row 3, the function displays the output in cells H3 to K3, because I specified that I wanted the range to have a width of 4.

You can also use the output range reference as an input to another array function, similar to what I did in rows 4 to 9.

If you reference a range of cells that are before the first row or the first column, it will result in a #REF! error. You can see this in row 10, where I tried to reference a cell above A1 (which obviously doesn’t exist).

How to use OFFSET to create dynamic ranges

One of the main benefits of using the OFFSET function is that it allows you to create dynamic ranges. These are ranges that automatically adjust when you add new data to the spreadsheet.

To illustrate this, I’ve taken a subset of the data from the previous example, and I’m using it to get the average Q1 sales for the salespeople shown.

OFFSET function 3

Instead of just using a typical AVERAGE function, I’ve combined it with the OFFSET function by typing =Average(B2:Offset(B6,-1,0)).

I am using the OFFSET function to define the range I want to be averaged. Here that is the array in cells B2 to B5.

However, instead of typing B5, I offset it, essentially saying “one cell above B6”. Doing this creates a dynamic range that will update if I add or remove data.

You can see this in the example below. Here I have added another salesperson, Albert, and the average sales updates automatically — thanks to the dynamic range.

OFFSET function 4

You will notice that the formula has adjusted automatically. Instead of showing B6 in the OFFSET function, it is now using cell B7 instead.

#REF! Error – Circular reference

More often than not, you may come across instances where the OFFSET function output overlaps with the offset target, resulting in a circular reference.

In such scenarios, Google Sheets returns a #REF! error.

I’ve demonstrated this in the snapshot below with colored borderlines. You’ll notice that I highlighted the possible overlap in red borders and yellow fill.

OFFSET function 5

That’s how to get started with Google Sheets OFFSET function. Looking for more spreadsheet tutorials and tips? Check out our other posts below!

Editor’s note: This is a revised version of a previous post that has been updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

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